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Boeing Jets

An employee works in the cockpit of a ...
Data da imagem: 20/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny210319145003
Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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An employee works in the cockpit of a 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash.

Data da imagem: 20/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny210319145003

An employee works in the cockpit of a 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash.

Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

An employee works in the cockpit of a 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash., March 20, 2019. In the wake of the two deadly crashes involving the same jet model, Boeing will make one of two safety features, both originally sold as extras, standard as part of a fix to get the planes in the air again. (Ruth Fremson/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Boeing Jets

The supermoon rises over a 737 MAX ...
Data da imagem: 20/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny210319144704
Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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The supermoon rises over a 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash.

Data da imagem: 20/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny210319144704

The supermoon rises over a 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash.

Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

The supermoon rises over a 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash., March 20, 2019. In the wake of the two deadly crashes involving the same jet model, Boeing will make one of two safety features, both originally sold as extras, standard as part of a fix to get the planes in the air again. (Ruth Fremson/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Boeing Jets

The supermoon rises over a 737 MAX ...
Data da imagem: 20/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny210319145204
Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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The supermoon rises over a 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash.

Data da imagem: 20/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny210319145204

The supermoon rises over a 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash.

Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

The supermoon rises over a 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash., March 20, 2019. In the wake of the two deadly crashes involving the same jet model, Boeing will make one of two safety features, both originally sold as extras, standard as part of a fix to get the planes in the air again. (Ruth Fremson/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Boeing Jets

Work on a 737 Max 8 at Boeing’s ...
Data da imagem: 20/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny230319135604
Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Work on a 737 Max 8 at Boeing’s plant in Renton, Wash.

Data da imagem: 20/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny230319135604

Work on a 737 Max 8 at Boeing’s plant in Renton, Wash.

Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Work on a 737 Max 8 at Boeing?s plant in Renton, Wash., March 20, 2019. The competitive pressure to build the 737 Max ? which permeated the entire design and development ? now threatens the reputation and profits of Boeing, after two deadly crashes in less than five months. (Ruth Fremson/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Boeing Jets

The supermoon rises over a 737 MAX ...
Data da imagem: 20/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny210319180904
Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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The supermoon rises over a 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash.

Data da imagem: 20/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny210319180904

The supermoon rises over a 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash.

Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

The supermoon rises over a 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash., March 20, 2019. In the wake of the two deadly crashes involving the same jet model, Boeing will make one of two safety features, both originally sold as extras, standard as part of a fix to get the planes in the air again. (Ruth Fremson/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Boeing Jets

A 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant ...
Data da imagem: 20/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny210319145404
Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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A 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash.

Data da imagem: 20/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny210319145404

A 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash.

Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

A 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash., March 20, 2019. In the wake of the two deadly crashes involving the same jet model, Boeing will make one of two safety features, both originally sold as extras, standard as part of a fix to get the planes in the air again. (Ruth Fremson/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Boeing Jets

An employee works on a 737 MAX ...
Data da imagem: 20/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny210319145604
Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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An employee works on a 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash.

Data da imagem: 20/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny210319145604

An employee works on a 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash.

Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

An employee works on a 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash., March 20, 2019. In the wake of the two deadly crashes involving the same jet model, Boeing will make one of two safety features, both originally sold as extras, standard as part of a fix to get the planes in the air again. (Ruth Fremson/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Boeing Jets

Rowers pass 737 MAX airplanes at ...
Data da imagem: 20/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny210319144804
Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Rowers pass 737 MAX airplanes at Boeing's plant in Renton, Wash.

Data da imagem: 20/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny210319144804

Rowers pass 737 MAX airplanes at Boeing's plant in Renton, Wash.

Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Rowers pass 737 MAX airplanes at Boeing's plant in Renton, Wash., March 20, 2019. In the wake of the two deadly crashes involving the same jet model, Boeing will make one of two safety features, both originally sold as extras, standard as part of a fix to get the planes in the air again. (Ruth Fremson/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Boeing Jets

A 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant ...
Data da imagem: 20/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny210319144904
Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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A 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash.

Data da imagem: 20/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny210319144904

A 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash.

Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

A 737 MAX airplane at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash., March 20, 2019. In the wake of the two deadly crashes involving the same jet model, Boeing will make one of two safety features, both originally sold as extras, standard as part of a fix to get the planes in the air again. (Ruth Fremson/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Boeing Jets

737 MAX airplanes at the Renton ...
Data da imagem: 20/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny210319112303
Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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737 MAX airplanes at the Renton Municipal Airport in Renton, Wash.

Data da imagem: 20/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny210319112303

737 MAX airplanes at the Renton Municipal Airport in Renton, Wash.

Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

737 MAX airplanes at the Renton Municipal Airport in Renton, Wash., March 20, 2019. In the wake of the two deadly crashes involving the same jet model, Boeing will make one of two safety features, both originally sold as extras, standard as part of a fix to get the planes in the air again. (Ruth Fremson/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Boeing Jets

737 MAX airplanes at Boein­g's plant ...
Data da imagem: 20/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny210319144504
Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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737 MAX airplanes at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash.

Data da imagem: 20/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny210319144504

737 MAX airplanes at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash.

Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

737 MAX airplanes at Boein­g's plant in Renton, Wash., March 20, 2019. In the wake of the two deadly crashes involving the same jet model, Boeing will make one of two safety features, both originally sold as extras, standard as part of a fix to get the planes in the air again. (Ruth Fremson/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Boeing Jets

A pair of Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft at ...
Data da imagem: 14/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny150319164204
Crédito: Nick Oxford/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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A pair of Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft at an American Airlines maintenance hangar at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma.

Data da imagem: 14/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny150319164204

A pair of Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft at an American Airlines maintenance hangar at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma.

Crédito: Nick Oxford/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

A pair of Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft at an American Airlines maintenance hangar at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma, March 14, 2019. American regulators grounded the 737 Max this week. A piece of the Boeing 737 Max 8 jet that crashed in Ethiopia last weekend killing 157 people, suggests that the plane?s stabilizers were tilted upward, according to two people with knowledge of the recovery operations. At that angle, the stabilizers would have forced down the nose of the jet, a similarity with the Lion Air crash in October. (Nick Oxford/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Boeing Jets

A pair of Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft ...
Data da imagem: 14/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny150319165004
Crédito: Nick Oxford/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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A pair of Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft sit near an American Airlines maintenance hangar at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma.

Data da imagem: 14/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny150319165004

A pair of Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft sit near an American Airlines maintenance hangar at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma.

Crédito: Nick Oxford/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

A pair of Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft sit near an American Airlines maintenance hangar at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma, March 14, 2019. American regulators grounded the 737 Max this week. A piece of the Boeing 737 Max 8 jet that crashed in Ethiopia last weekend killing 157 people, suggests that the plane?s stabilizers were tilted upward, according to two people with knowledge of the recovery operations. At that angle, the stabilizers would have forced down the nose of the jet, a similarity with the Lion Air crash in October. (Nick Oxford/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Boeing Jets

A Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft at an ...
Data da imagem: 14/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny150319164904
Crédito: Nick Oxford/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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A Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft at an American Airlines maintenance hangar at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma.

Data da imagem: 14/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny150319164904

A Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft at an American Airlines maintenance hangar at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma.

Crédito: Nick Oxford/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

A Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft at an American Airlines maintenance hangar at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma, March 14, 2019. American regulators grounded the 737 Max this week. A piece of the Boeing 737 Max 8 jet that crashed in Ethiopia last weekend killing 157 people, suggests that the plane?s stabilizers were tilted upward, according to two people with knowledge of the recovery operations. At that angle, the stabilizers would have forced down the nose of the jet, a similarity with the Lion Air crash in October. (Nick Oxford/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Boeing Jets

A pair of Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft at ...
Data da imagem: 14/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny150319164604
Crédito: Nick Oxford/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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A pair of Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft at an American Airlines maintenance hangar at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma.

Data da imagem: 14/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny150319164604

A pair of Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft at an American Airlines maintenance hangar at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma.

Crédito: Nick Oxford/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

A pair of Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft at an American Airlines maintenance hangar at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma, March 14, 2019. American regulators grounded the 737 Max this week. A piece of the Boeing 737 Max 8 jet that crashed in Ethiopia last weekend killing 157 people, suggests that the plane?s stabilizers were tilted upward, according to two people with knowledge of the recovery operations. At that angle, the stabilizers would have forced down the nose of the jet, a similarity with the Lion Air crash in October. (Nick Oxford/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Boeing Jets

A pair of Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft at ...
Data da imagem: 14/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny150319164304
Crédito: Nick Oxford/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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A pair of Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft at an American Airlines maintenance hangar at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma.

Data da imagem: 14/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny150319164304

A pair of Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft at an American Airlines maintenance hangar at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma.

Crédito: Nick Oxford/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

A pair of Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft at an American Airlines maintenance hangar at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma, March 14, 2019. American regulators grounded the 737 Max this week. A piece of the Boeing 737 Max 8 jet that crashed in Ethiopia last weekend killing 157 people, suggests that the plane?s stabilizers were tilted upward, according to two people with knowledge of the recovery operations. At that angle, the stabilizers would have forced down the nose of the jet, a similarity with the Lion Air crash in October. (Nick Oxford/The New York Times/Fotoarena

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Boeing Jets

An American Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 ...
Data da imagem: 14/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny170319154705
Crédito: Nick Oxford/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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An American Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft comes in for a landing at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma.

Data da imagem: 14/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny170319154705

An American Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft comes in for a landing at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma.

Crédito: Nick Oxford/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

An American Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft comes in for a landing at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma, March 14, 2019. American, Southwest and United are the three airlines in the United States with Max planes in their fleets. Following the Ethiopian Airlines and Lion Air crashes, the stakes for Boeing are high, with 4,600 pending orders that promise to bring in hundreds of billions of dollars. (Nick Oxford/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Boeing Jets

An American Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 ...
Data da imagem: 14/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny150319164703
Crédito: Nick Oxford/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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An American Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft comes in for a landing at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma.

Data da imagem: 14/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny150319164703

An American Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft comes in for a landing at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma.

Crédito: Nick Oxford/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

An American Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft comes in for a landing at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma, March 14, 2019. American regulators grounded the 737 Max this week. A piece of the Boeing 737 Max 8 jet that crashed in Ethiopia last weekend killing 157 people, suggests that the plane?s stabilizers were tilted upward, according to two people with knowledge of the recovery operations. At that angle, the stabilizers would have forced down the nose of the jet, a similarity with the Lion Air crash in October. (Nick Oxford/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Boeing Jets

President Donald Trump at a White ...
Data da imagem: 13/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny130319163805
Crédito: Doug Mills/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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President Donald Trump at a White House briefing where he announced that the United States was grounding Boeing’s 737 Max aircraft.

Data da imagem: 13/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny130319163805

President Donald Trump at a White House briefing where he announced that the United States was grounding Boeing’s 737 Max aircraft.

Crédito: Doug Mills/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

President Donald Trump speaks during a briefing on drug interdiction efforts, at the White House in Washington, March 13, 2019. Trump announced here that the United States was grounding Boeing?s 737 Max aircraft, reversing an earlier decision by American regulators to keep the jets flying in the wake of a second deadly crash in Ethiopia. (Doug Mills/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Boeing Jets

President Donald Trump at a White ...
Data da imagem: 13/03/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny130319162904
Crédito: Doug Mills/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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President Donald Trump at a White House briefing where he announced that the United States was grounding Boeing’s 737 Max aircraft.

Data da imagem: 13/03/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny130319162904

President Donald Trump at a White House briefing where he announced that the United States was grounding Boeing’s 737 Max aircraft.

Crédito: Doug Mills/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

President Donald Trump speaks during a briefing on drug interdiction efforts, at the White House in Washington, March 13, 2019. Trump announced here that the United States was grounding Boeing?s 737 Max aircraft, reversing an earlier decision by American regulators to keep the jets flying in the wake of a second deadly crash in Ethiopia. (Doug Mills/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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